How much protein you need is often a question debated among those who lift weights. Protein is only for men or weightlifters, right? 

 

I would definitely say no. 

Your body is dependent on protein, it plays a very important role since every cell in your body partly consists of protein, and cells renew and need to be repaired. This is especially true for your muscles. This is where protein powders come in – you get the extra protein and it helps your body to recover faster and repair cells and muscles. Proteins do not make you huge, but helps your body to recover faster after every workout. Protein also have many other important functions in your body, which I will talk more about later. 

 

Back to the topic. 

So what about women, do women need extra protein, and how much? 

The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) is 0.8 grams per kilo of body weight. However if you workout on a regular basis you really should read on. 

 

In a research at the Performance & Physique Enhancement Laboratory at the University of South Florida, an eight week study of two groups of women was conducted. All women completed a strength training plan, one group ate a high protein diet; the other group ate a lower protein diet. 

 

The high protein group ate 2.4 grams of protein per kilo of body weight, which included 25 grams of protein from protein powder before and after training. The lower protein group was told to eat 1.2 grams of protein per kilo of body weight, note that this is still higher than the 0.8 RDA. 

 

 

So what about the result? 

 The group that had a higher-protein diet gained significantly more lean body mass (4.6 pounds) compared to the lower-protein group (1.5 pounds). 

 Besides the main study results, interstingly the authors also noted that the group who consumed more protein also lost more body fat than the group that consumed less protein. I find this a highly interesting point, and if the followup study with that focus is published I will definitely write about it here! 

Other positive effects from protein 

Many of us spend long days in the office, and it’s easy to get hunger cravings after something sweet. Protein powders stabilize your energy levels and appetite. Switching that extra round to Family Mart for a protein shake instead will satisfy the hunger feeling without the sugary side effects. 

Furthermore, use of Whey protein have shown to give an immune boost as well. Whey protein contains glutathione, a tripeptide that helps preventing damage to important cellular components caused by heavy metals. Take this into extra consideration if you live in a place with frequent air pollution


Conclusion 

Consuming protein has many positive effects on both men and women, protein is needed to recover and repair the body after all sorts of workout. Focus on eating high-quality sources such as chicken, fish, eggs, and high quality Whey Protein Powder. 

 

Having a hard time getting all the protein you need? Try Optimum Nutrition Protein Powder. It’s the world’s best selling protein, and it taste delicious, scan the QR code to open the webshop. If you have any questions you can also reach us through our official account. 

 

 
References
  1. Campbell B, Aguilar D, Vargas A, Conlin A, Sanders A, Fink-Irizarry P, Norton L, Perry R, McCallum R, Wynn MR, and Lenton J. Effects of a high (2.4 g/kg) vs. low/moderate (1.2 g/kg) protein intake on body composition in aspiring female physique athletes engaging in an 8-week resistance training program. Presented at the 2016 International Society of Sports Nutrition Annual Conference, Clearwater, Florida, June 2016.  
  1. Antonio J, Peacock C.A., Ellerbroek A., Fromhoff B., Silver T. (2014) The effects of consuming a high protein diet (4.4 g/kg/d) on body composition in resistance-trained individuals. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, 12(39).
  1. Antonio, J., Ellerbroek, A., Silver, T., Orris, S., Scheiner, M., Gonzalez, A., & Peacock, C.A. (2015). A high protein diet (3.4 g/kg/d) combined with a heavy resistance training program improves body composition in healthy trained men and women-a follow-up investigation. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition12(1), 1.

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